Smith Official DNA & One Name Study

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Family: Phillip D Smith / Unknown (F32331)

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  • Phillip D SmithFather | Male
    Phillip D Smith

    Born     
    Died  21 Jan 1837  Hamilton Co,OH,USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Married     
    Father   
    Mother   

    UnknownMother | Female
    Unknown

    Born     
    Died  13 Sep 1835  Hamilton,OH,USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Father   
    Mother   

    Henry SmithChild 1 | Male
    + Henry Smith

    Born     
    Died     
    Buried     
    Spouse  Mary | F32332 
    Married     


  • Notes 
    • Speers recieved a warrant on the land on April 17, 1769. He sold it to Philip Smyth in 1816. Not much is known about Smyth, except for a slur delivered by a traveler in a jounal who called the town's founder "a fat, irgnorant Dutchman".

      Smyth, who had already owned a tavern in the surrounding Addison Township, laid out the town in 1818 as Smythfield. But the name had to be changed because there already existed a town called Smithfield in Fayette County.

      The town grew with the creation of the National Pike, which ran through the middle of Somerfield. The town actually had only two streets: Bridge Street (which was Route 40 and ended at the triple arch Bridge) and River Road, which ran along the Youghiogheny River. In addition, there were a few alleys.

      Across the river from Somerfield was the town of Jockey Hollow. Down the river was Watsondale. In all, the Army Corps of Engineers reports 10 villages were destroyed for the creation of the Dam.

      On July 4, 1818, the Triple Arch Bridge was dedicated. It had been built by three men named Kinkaid, Beck and Evans, who were housed in a tavern built especially for them: the Youghiogheny House, which was later owned by the Endsley family and eventually run by the Cornish family as the Cornish Hotel.

      Dedication of that bridge was a momentous occasion. President James Monroe, along with several members of his cabinet and other officials, turned out. Residents from all over the countyside were present.

      The town grew and prospered with westward expansion. A number of Taverns or Hotels were built. Several stage coach lines had stops in the town, including the Good Intent Stage Company and Stockton Lines. Many stage coach drivers lived in the town.
      - History on Somerfield Pennsylvania by Frances Borsodi Zajac http://www.pagenweb.org/~somerset/addison/somerfield_town.htm